Project in Albany to Help Elderly Disabled Woman: Some Skilles Needed

This coming Saturday, we have a LOCAL PROJECT opportunity in Albany .  An elderly disabled woman needs to have a door and grab bars installed.

Chris Bennett is the lead.  He needs just two (2) volunteers with some skills.  Again,  the work is scheduled for Saturday, January 19.  Contact Chris at 518-879-5239 for more details and/or to sign up.

Time to Think About Uganda Trip

It’s that time again! We need to start planning The Giving Circle  Summer 2019 team trip to our Ugandan projects and family. As usual, we’ll be going in early July.

If you are in any way considering making the trip with us or want more information, please email us at mark@thegivingcircle.org.

 

More Chess Talk

Mark says:

I need to talk about our amazing chess success again. Our Busoga Chess team finished second in a large event. The team included Ashiraf Naminya, one of our deaf students!!! Before we started our programs for the deaf and disabled, he was one more child thrown away. It was believed that these kids could not be educated. And just to prove everybody wrong, he plays on our chess team that won second place in a major event! Pure joy.

 

More Chess Success

VERY Proud of our Busoga Jr School. They finished SECOND at the VERY large Robert Katende Initiative Chess Tournament!

 Way to go team!!!

 

Santa’s Helpers Make an Early Delivery to Code Blue Guests

Christmas came early to our friends at Code Blue. Our Out Reach Team, led as usual by Rachel Dwyer, Patti Riggi, and Melissa Renee, assembled little goodie bags for everyone. Thanks to Saratoga Stronger for the coffee cards. Our Giving Circle ladies clearly love working together. And Little Evie, Rachel’s personal Christmas Elf, stuffed all the bags this morning.

Eucalyptus Infused Candles To The Rescue

 

We have two important health related goals for 2019. We must 1) minimize malaria and 2) address the damage to lungs and eyes caused by kerosene and paraffin lamps used in most African homes and huts.

Malaria kills one child every thirty seconds or about 3000 children every day, totaling 1,095,000 per year.

In Africa and much of the third world, the only light to be found at night illuminating huts and homes is from kerosene and paraffin lamps. These lamps damage eyes and lungs. They also attract Malaria carrying mosquitoes. Most families in very poor villages cannot afford mosquito nets. As a result, even once the lamps are out, the mosquitoes continue their damage, spreading deadly Malaria to children.

In response to both these issues, there appears to be a single solution. Candles, produced at a price anyone can afford, would easily replace the lamps as sources of light. When infused with eucalyptus oil, the candles also repel mosquitoes.

The needed oil is extracted from the leaves of eucalyptus trees grown widely in Uganda for the wood. Therefore, the oil is most available. Producing candles infused with eucalyptus offers an income source to the women of our villages. In other words, making these candles may provide freedom from Malaria, healthier light sources, and jobs.

Stay tuned.

 

More Celebration of the Holidays

Dec 14, Mark said we must watch these videos.  They were shot during the Christmas/Holiday party in Wairaka village.  Long Live The Giving  Circle!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proof Sponsorship Works For Our Kids

 Proscovia “Prossy” Nakiranda , part of our first group of sponsorship children, has graduated and as of two weeks ago is a registered Social Worker. And we can thank the Siragusa family (Thomas, Alison, et al) for their sponsorship and great support.

When Proscovia’s father died of AIDS in 2006, she was left living in a state of deep poverty, going some days with absolutely no food. Her mother was doing manual work for neighbors to try to raise money for food, but developed a serious illness that still prohibits her working. Whatever hope Proscovia had of attending school was stolen. That was true until she came into our sponsorship program and came to experience the love and support of the Siragusa family.

Prossy’s success story is just one of the many our sponsored kids can claim. We have had children grow into young adulthood and achieve careers as certified nurses, auto mechanics, hair dressers, and much more. And, in addition to that, two more of our now grown sponsorship kids are in law school.

It just does not get better than this.